BUILDING A SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY


Theology Class – Fourth Tuesday Night, (once a month) beginning February 26, 2019.


Teachers :  Rich Planchet and Pastor Josh will be co-teaching a Theology 101 class for any male or female interested in learning from a systematic theology.   


Download Session One Notes Here


Download Session Two Notes Below

Download Session Three Notes Below

Download Session Four Notes Below

Please see Pastor Josh with any questions.  Josh.FCBC@gmail.com.  


Goal


The goal is for each person to write their own systematic theology. For those who want to formalize their theological training, participants can work through the EFCA’s lay person licensing requirements. See EFCA’s license paper requirements –https://www.efca.org/resources/document/credentialing-certificate-christian-ministry 


Resources


The good news is there are plenty of good resources that have served the church well and will strengthen your understanding of the faith. You will need to choose the systematic theology that you want to use as your textbook. Below you’ll find my brief evaluation of several systematic theologies, with the reading level noted for each (Beginner or Medium). 

  • Wayne Grudem, Systematic Theology (1994). Grudem is hard to beat for clarity, accessibility, and readability. Level: Medium (one volume). For a shorter version, you may also want to use Bible Doctrine or Christian Beliefs. Level: Beginner (one volume).
  • R. C. Sproul, Everyone’s a Theologian (2014). This is the book I recommend to Christians who are completely new to systematic theology. It’s a great, relatively brief, introductory volume with Sproul’s typical energy and clarity. Level: Beginner (one volume).
  • Charles Ryrie, Basic Theology (1999). Professor from Dallas Theological Seminary, Ryrie is able to write a magnum opus of theology, but he serves the Bride by offering an introduction to theology. The strength and weakness of this book is its bite size chapters. It is short and clear, but there is little that is creative or fresh. It is a classic dispensational (83 pages on Things to Come) systematic theology that reads like an analytical outline. Level: Beginner (one volume).
  • John MacArthur, Biblical Doctrine (2017). After a lifetime of “unleashing God’s truth” one verse at a time, MacArthur has put together the truths he has taught for years into a systematic theology. Level: Medium (one volume).
  • Louis Berkhof, Systematic Theology (1938).A model of order, precision, and (relative) brevity. If reformed theology is your thing, you will not find a better one-volume systematic theology in the Reformed tradition. Level: Medium (one volume)